Chiropractic Definitions

Chiropractic Definitions


Chiropractic
deals primarily with the spine and its relationship to the health and
well-being of the individual. Chiropractic care utilizes conservative non-surgical
treatment and most commonly treats the neck and back. Chiropractic treatment
is also used with other areas of the body to facilitate better movement of the
upper extremities (e.g., shoulder, arm and hand) and the lower extremities (e.g.,
hip, leg and foot).

Diversified Technique is considered the most standard chiropractic manipulative
technique. Its objective is to restore proper movement and alignment of the
spine and treat joint dysfunction.

Gonstead Technique addresses all areas of subluxations or fixations to treat
a variety of conditions. This technique recognizes misalignments and increases
muscle and joint mobility by applying different levels of pressure. Usually the
patient is seated in a chair for the chiropractor to adjust specific neck problems.
The lower back is treated by having the patient lie on his/her side or stomach on a
chiropractic table.

Motion Palpation is a hand technique a chiropractor uses to determine if the
vertebrae are properly aligned.

Myofascial Release is a manipulative treatment that attempts to release tension
in the fascia or connective tissue due to inflammation, poor posture, or trauma.
Points of restriction in the fascia can place pressure on nerves and muscles
causing chronic pain.

Side Posture is a position that uses a firm, quick thrust that the chiropractor
applies to a misaligned vertebra. This occurs while the patient is on his/her side.

Thompson Technique is a method that involves the completion of a leg check
analysis, which compares the length of the legs. The chiropractor determines
the type of misalignment and in turn adjusts the spine using a combination of
multiple thrusts on various joints. This technique uses a "drop table" for
adjustment. A gentle thrust is applied to the targeted area setting a drop piece
in motion. This in turn manipulates and adjusts a specific targeted joint or tissue
area.